Wonder in the Woods

Living and Learning in the Pacific Northwest

The Daily 5

I’m reading “The Daily 5” by “The 2 Sisters” Gail Boushey and Joan Moser.   This review by Angela at “The Cornerstone for Teachers” is informative and helpful.  I do believe The Daily 5 will work for homeschooling, especially if children have not reached independence with their literacy activities.  The Daily 5 includes Read to Self, Read to Someone, Listen to Reading, Work on Writing, and Word Work.

I want to follow Charlotte Mason’s short lessons for young children, so we will start with the recommended 3 minutes to build stamina (comparable to Charlotte Mason’s habit training) and then work up to 10-15 minutes (or whatever feels comfortable).  If our boys want to read or write longer, they can certainly do this.  We have this flexibility.  I do read to them at bedtime so this counts in the total literacy time too.  Since my kids are younger, this great example of a daily *4* is something we can do now.

The sisters insist that children choose their own books by going to the library to find “good-fit” books.  They model for their students how to find a “good-fit” book.  Their examples of a “good-fit” book and “ways to read a book” are extremely helpful for me since I am stuck on Charlotte Mason’s concept of “twaddle.”  I want to avoid twaddle.  However, kids need to start somewhere and they need to *enjoy* reading.  I’m not rushing out to buy “Captain Underpants” but I do need to stop being a book snob.   This is a point where Charlotte Mason might disagree since she believed in high quality book choices — living books.

Hunter has not heard much twaddle (not counting television).  Most importantly, he has a taste for good stories, so I have to believe he will want to progress to more substance.  I agree with the sisters assertion that trust is essential for independence.

I am also reassured by their description of public school models that DO NOT work. In my opinion, except for the number of children, “The Daily 5″ really looks more like homeschool than public school – right down to the couches and home-like atmosphere.

If you read this book or plan to read this book, I would love to hear your opinions.

The Daily 5: Part 2

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11 comments on “The Daily 5

  1. Silvia
    August 30, 2010

    It sounds very interesting, Cori…I like that idea of trust in the children.

    • Silvia
      August 30, 2010

      I want to read the book, I’ll tell you if if/when I do what my opinion is.

      • Wonder in the Woods
        August 30, 2010

        Silvia! I am wondering what you would think of this book. I’m heading out this morning for my favorite Chai and to read the rest of this book –it’s a thin book. I’m curious about the word work and writing portion. Even if it not compatible with CM, I think the modeling, techniques and structure of the method could be very helpful to us. The kids get to *choose* the order they do The Daily 5 too.

  2. Pam
    August 31, 2010

    It does look like an interesting book. I may also take a peek at it. Thanks.

    • Wonder in the Woods
      September 1, 2010

      Pam, I changed the first paragraph of Part 2 after considering that many homeschooling families are bigger than ours. I like the tips for “coaching or time” and I do believe this book might helps us avoid competition among my boys. There was also some tips about managing noise levels (that I was not concerned about) but with a bigger family, this might be something you can use. You have a beautiful family by the way!! :-) Thanks for stopping by… ~Cori

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  4. Emily
    May 3, 2012

    Hi! I was wondering if you’ve still been using the Daily 5″ and how it’s going with home schooling. I’m currently a public school teacher and love the daily 5 concepts. I’m looking forward to see if they can work for me in the home school setting for my soon to be 2nd and 1st grader next year when we start home schooling.

    • Wonder in the Woods
      May 3, 2012

      This last year I’ve worked with my boys to read together and reduce sibling competition. Waiting for the person to ask for help, etc. My youngest is learning to read easily but reading is harder for my older boy. So he was naturally feeling like he needs to stay ahead, etc. I explained to them that everyone has different things they are good at and how they both learn differently. We talked about the brain being a muscle and they need to use it for it to grow bigger. The suggestions in the book really helped with finding the good fit books. Both boys are reading and writing now, so a true Daily 5 is something I plan to use more from here on out. I was just thinking of getting the book out again. I’m not a public school teacher and we’ve been homeschooling for 4 years now. I found the book to be helpful for a home setting. I’m glad I own the book.

      • Candis
        June 29, 2012

        I was going to ask this same question as a public school educator who read the Daily 5 when it first came out. I was thinking about implementing it at home with my preschooler and came across your blog via Google. I am also reading a lot about Charlotte Mason (how had I not heard about her in my 13 years in education?) and love your insights. I agree that the Daily 5 tries to make a home at school as they try to make the activities surrounding reading as authentic to real-life as possible!

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  6. 1mum5kids
    June 25, 2014

    I agree with you. I am about to start my year 6 son at homeschool for 12 months while I am still studying myself. The others will stay in school but I believe that the one on one with the daily 5 and Math daily 3 he will excell. Thanks for the share.. :)

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